All posts by Renaud Bédard

I Know This (Global Game Jam 2015)

“I Know This” is a game I made for the Global Game Jam 2015 along with Gavin McCarthy (art, design), Adam Axbey (sound effects) and Matthew Simmonds (4mat) (music); I did programming and design. The name we chose for the team was Two’s Complement.

As seen on Kill Screen (who posted the first article on the game, thanks a million!), Polygon, Popular Mechanics, Rock Paper Shotgun and many more! We’re flabbergasted, and very grateful for how popular our silly jam game has gotten.

Downloads

Windows x86 (version 1.1) : iknowthis_win_v1.1.zip
Mac Universal (version 1.1) : iknowthis_mac_v1.1.zip
Linux Universal (version 1.1) : iknowthis_linux_v1.1.tar.gz

Update Notes

v1.1 (2015-02-20)

  • Linux : Build now works! The Unity 5.0 beta version it was originally built with had issues with Linux, now built with RC2
  • Mac/Linux : Builds should be executable out of the zip or tarball without the need for chmod
  • Mac/Linux : File icons and names now display correctly, though they are not sniffed from the machine, it’s a pre-built list coming from mine
  • Mac : Hacking now affects percentages (yeah… I should’ve tested this a bit more thoroughly)
  • Fixed “magenta rectangle” overlay on Shader Model 2.0 or lower GPUs
  • Delete key works as well as backspace key to clear red characters
  • Tweaked Clicky interactions (6 honeypots instead of 5, the wrong text was triggered when finishing your first hack, mentions more clearly that red text needs to be removed)
  • Admin scan bar flashes and turns red when you’re running out of hacking time
  • Hacking timer now starts at 35 seconds (originally 30), and will get shorter or longer depending if you fail or succeed hacks (cheap adaptive difficulty!)
  • Added license file with credits and acknowledgements (released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-ShareAlike license)

Version 1.1 should clear all known bugs except for the seemingly rare “return does nothing” and the “redtext has HTML code in it” bugs which I can’t reproduce accurately at the moment. Let me know if there are new/other issues! And thanks for your patience.


Thanks to Jon Remedios for play-testing the game at the TGGJ!

Straight outta Isla Nublar

Remember that one scene in Jurassic Park? The one where Lex hacks the computer system in order to lock a door and protect everyone from the raptors, and exclaims…

unix-jurassic-park

That was basically the whole premise for our game.

When I saw the movie as a kid, that scene (and the file system UI that Lex “hacks”) always stuck with me as a quintessential faux-futuristic Hollywood representation of how computers work. I learned a bit later that this GUI was not made for the movie, but actually existed on SGI workstations and was ported to Linux as well, so it’s more legit than it looks! But in the end, it’s still a really great artifact of 90’s VR hopes and dreams, in which everything is better in 3D, even file browsers. (and Web browsers, too)

fsn1

The Game

It starts with the same basic premise as the scene in the movie : you have to find a file. To make it more interesting than your average hidden object game, you need to hack specific Search Nodes (purple files) which, upon successful hacking, will help you narrow down which potential Golden Folder contains what you’re looking for. Don’t pick the wrong one though, all the other ones are full of viruses and bad stuff!
Fun fact : the filenames you’ll see in the game are lifted from your hard drive, and 8.3ified for formatting and retro-chic reasons!

hacking

Hacking involves mashing your keyboard until code appears, and hitting the return key where the line endings are, just like in real life. The hacking minigame was heavily inspired by hackertyper.net, a fantastic way to feel like you’re real good at making up C code on the fly. However, we gamified it (oh, the horror) by not letting you go further than line endings, and adding a timer.

As you hack (or fail to hack) search nodes, sentinels will spawn and start looking for you. If they catch you, they warp you back at the root folder. Not a huge punishment, but enough to make you at least a little careful.

clicky

And then there’s Clicky, your favourite Office Assistant ripoff. He means well, but he sometimes gets in the way… and hides a dark secret. :o

Closing Thoughts

I don’t know that the game really qualifies as a jam game, because I worked for many evenings after the jam to smooth out the rough edges, make better Clicky interactions, fix the endings and other various bugs. The party version of the game was without music, I asked 4mat to produce something for us after the fact, and we were so so so lucky to have him contribute the lovely tunes you can hear in the game.

This was also my first experience with Unity 5, but I barely touched what it can accomplish. I’d say that the Audio engine is really nice, ducking was painless to implement… and the new UI stuff (even if it’s 4.6 and not 5) was a joy to use compared to the old GUI system.

And Gavin is the best! First time jamming with him, and it was a great match of design sensibilities, work-mindedness and just plain fun. <3

littleBits Jams

If you follow me on twitter this will be no surprise, but I am completely obsessed with the littleBits modular electronics system, especially the synth bits that came from their collaboration with Korg which are geared especially towards music-making.

I bought my first Synth Kit in April 2014 and fell in love with it. It took less than three weeks for me to order extensions (because let’s face it, the base kit is pretty limitative) and ended up building an obscenely huge collection of modules over the summer.

I even gave a talk in Mexico City about littleBits (among other things) during DevHR, a local technology and games conference. (you can read the slides here)

I’ve been doing a lot of “jams”, basically just toying with modules until I got something that was good enough to show.
I learned a lot about how synths work, circuit design and signal processing by doing them, and it’s great to be able to play with something that does not involve a computer once in a while.

Initially I just posted Instagram or Vine videos of them, but recently I’ve bought myself an USB sound card and am posting them to SoundCloud so they got a bit more long-form.

The constraints for what I consider to be a “jam” :

  • Don’t work on it for more than 2 or 3 hours (usually closer to an hour)
  • Record everything live, no post-processing other than trimming the ends, and fading them in or out

And the beauty of an analog system is that I’d have a really hard time reproducing an earlier jam, so once it’s unhooked and put aside, it’s gone. All I have from it is the recording. I tend to try something specific when starting a new jam, too, so there’s no point to repeat myself.

Here’s a collection of the longer (1 to 3 minutes) jams I’ve recorded. I’ll update as I post more.

I plan to gather the best of them when I got enough to call it an album, get it somewhat mastered and release it somewhere. Stay tuned, if you enjoy that type of thing!

P.S. If you’re interested in the earlier stuff, here’s a chronological list of every littleBits audio recording I’ve posted outside of SoundCloud (I = Instagram, V = Vine, YT = YouTube, hover for description) : V, I, V, I, I, V, I, I, V, I, I, I, V, V, I, I, V, V, YT, V, V, V, V, V, V, V

Malisse

Malisse Logo

Malisse is a game I made at TOJam “Party like it’s 19TOJam9″ in 2014 with Devine Lu Linvega, Rekka B., Dom2D and technobeanie as Les Collégiennes, with sound effects by dualryan.

The game is playable in the web player at its itch.io home : http://renaudbedard.itch.io/malisse

It uses Unity and the whole source code and assets are hosted in a public repository on GitHub, and released under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

Malisse screenshot

The gameplay is a two-player cooperative physics sandbox and puzzle game. The objective for both players is to clear a path for Malisse as she walks on a sinuous path in the world through the looking glass…

A bunch of rabbits trail behind her, but they get scared easily! Everytime Malisse bumps into an object she cannot climb, a rabbit will run away, but you recover one rabbit for every level cleared. If all the rabbits are gone, Malisse ends up alone and … cries herself to death? That’s the end of that play session, anyway!
Otherwise, the levels are chosen randomly from a pool of 11 hastily-authored levels which vary in difficulty. If you get stuck early on your first attempt, definitely give it another shot since you might find more palatable challenges.

It was an interesting game jamming experience for me in many respects : first time with a 5-person team, first time implementing sprite animations in Unity (using 2D Toolkit), and first time writing a tool for use inside the Unity editor — a spline tool for drawing roads quickly. We also had interesting last-minute collision issues, since we wanted Malisse to be able to climb slopes but didn’t want to resort to rigid bodies to have that done automagically. Spherecasting to the rescue, and lots of debugging! ^_^

If you’re wondering, the music was made during the jam by Devine (aka Aliceffekt), based on “When Johnny Comes Marching Home”, because it just fits marching so damn well.

Other than the web player, you can download the OS X and Windows standalone builds.

Enjoy! Had lots of fun building it. Closing with an outstanding band shot of us by Myriame Pilgrim!

LES COLLÉGIENNES

Pyramidwarf

Pyramidwarf is a game I made in collaboration with Samuel Boucher (alias Monsieur Eurêka) with music by Stefan Boucher at the Global Game Jam 2014 in the TAG Lab of the Concordia University, in Montréal. The version you can download here is a tweaked, split-screen version of the “party build” you can find on the GGJ website.

Windows : pyramidwarf-final-1.01-windows.zip [12 Mb]
Mac : pyramidwarf-final-1.01-mac.zip [12 Mb]

Pyramidwarf's glorious title screen

This was my first experience with Samuel in a jam, he’s a kickass vector artist currently working with Ko-Op on GNOG, which you should totally check out.

(the game was demoed at the Montréal Joue Arcade 11, too!)

We worked with Unity, as is the usual for me in game jams, and the initial idea was to make a stacking game where you’d either race the other player with a really unstable stack of little guys, or throw parts of your pyramid to the other player’s to break it up. And of course, this being a game jam, we didn’t do half of the stuff we planned for, and ended up with a super janky physics-based stacking game that happens to be silly enough to be fun!

Pyramidwarf Gameplay

On my side, it was my first time really exploiting Unity physics in a game. I’d done some basic rigid-body stuff and used character controllers (Volkenessen was physics based as well), but never hinges or physics-based multi-body animation. One of the fun/interesting parts to do under pressure was the walk animation using torque and impulses : the leg pushes itself up, angles up, the body gets a magical shove and the legs readjust themselves to stay upright. It’s definitely not physically correct, but it looks like a bunch of cardboard puppets and that’s exactly what we were going for!

To build the pyramid, dwarves need to go up somehow, and the way we solved that is just… teleportation. These little guys have magic on their side, and they can teleport to the first free spot of the pyramid to keep stacking up. This caused rigidbody overlapping problems that I sorta resolved by just testing a whole lot if something’s there before teleporting, and denying the move otherwise.

The “final 1.01″ build I posted here is not bug-free, but it’s shippable, so here goes. I might come back to it and fix rendering issues, and maybe implement dwarf-throwing, because it still sounds so great in my head.

Enjoy!

RAIN+BOW

RAIN+BOW is game I made with Devine Lu Linvega as Les Collégiennes during TOJam Sixy Times in 2011, and lay on the backburner for many years until it was resurrected for a showing at Gamercamp in 2013, this past weekend! We finally took the time to add polishing touches and add gamepad support, so I’m happy to release this version as the final public build!

Windows : raincrossbow_win_final.zip [16 MB]
Mac : raincrossbow_mac_final.zip [21 MB]

RAIN+BOW Screenshot

What am I looking at?

RAIN+BOW is a bullet hell, or a shmup where you need to make your way through a sea of bullets and enemies and hopefully kill some of them in the process. There is no score tracking, but the game tracks how far you were able to get and remembers your highest “score” for this playthrough. You have no health; a single bullet hitting your head will kill you, but as is usual in those kind of games, the hitbox is much smaller than the character.

OH MY GAH

There are three weapons at your disposal :

  • RAIN (-) : The “machine gun” continuous firing weapon, which does little damage but will grind away at oncoming enemies
  • CROSS (+) : The auto-guided missiles, which you can’t aim but will target nearby enemies and will clear up enemies behind you
  • BOW (|) : The laser weapon, which does take its time to charge but inflicts major damage, especially effective against blue “shield” enemies and columns of weaker enemies

Sometimes you’ll see an orange cat presenting you a power-up for one of your weapons; definitely kill that guy and grab the powerup to get a more effective firing rate and effectiveness, and if you reach level 3, a temporary ultra-powerful rainbow firing mode for that weapon.

You might think that spamming all three weapons at once is a good idea, but the firing rate is halved for every simultaneous weapon, which means you should prioritize the one you think is best suited for the situation, and fire off CROSS missiles every once in a while.

RAIN+BOW was made in Unity, with the models made in Cinema4D by Devine, and original music also created on the jam site by him back in 2011. It doesn’t use textures at all (all flat-coloured materials), and we even avoided transparency in favour of rapidly flashing entities on and off, to give an even more psychedelic and retro-arcadey feel to the game.
The levels are randomly generated based on predefined “events” that are presented in a random order, with some variation, in a very simplistic Spelunky-like way. Game difficulty varies wildly because the algorithms for level generation are quite crude, but it ends up being challenging and fun every time, which is what counts,… right?

Enjoy! And let me know if you get crazy high scores. :)

Ogg streaming using OpenTK and NVorbis

Updated September 7th 2012 : New OggStream class with better support for concurrent stream playback.

I was looking for a suitable replacement for the audio streaming and compression capabilities of XACT when porting an XNA project to MonoGame, and it doesn’t look like there’s a clear winner yet. MonoGame contributors suggested NAudio, but it looks like work needs to be done to make it portable, and the sample code is a mess. FMod EX or competing commercial solutions are an easy but costly choice. So I turned to OpenAL to see if it can be a free and usable solution for streaming compressed audio with some DSP capabilities.
T’was a bit challenging, but not impossible! :)

Decoding OGGs

Out of the box, OpenAL doesn’t support being fed MP3 or OGG sources. There are extensions for those, but according to one implementation, they’re deprecated. So you need to handle decoding yourself and feed the PCM bitstream to OpenAL.

It sure would be nice to have a purely managed implementation of libVorbis, but it doesn’t exist, so there’s a dozen homemade decoders floating around open source code hubs in various states of workability. I was pointed to NVorbis by TheGrandHero on the TIGSource forums, and I haven’t found a better alternative yet. CsVorbis is another, but it doesn’t support streaming, all the decoding is done up-front, which defeats the purpose. OggSharp is just a fork of CsVorbis with XNA helpers, so nope. TheGrandHero also mentioned trying out DragonOgg but having problems with it.

NVorbis worked like a charm for me, but it’s pretty early and doesn’t support some features like seeking around the stream, so looping or restarting playback requires creating a new whole new reader/decoder. I also took some time to optimize the memory usage in my fork of the project.
07/09/2012 Update : Andrew Ward, the author of NVorbis, resolved the memory allocation problems that the version I forked off had, so I pulled the new changes out instead.

Streaming

Once you have some decoded data, you have to make OpenAL stream it. This is sort of tricky but welldocumented.

(this image shamelessly stolen from Ben Britten’s blog entry linked above)

The basic idea is the following :

  • Generate one OpenAL source for your sound file, like XACT cues
  • Generate 2 or more OpenAL buffers
  • Fill at least one of those with the first samples of the sound and enqueue it/them to the source
  • Start playback of the source; it’ll play all the buffers associated with it, in order
  • In a background thread :
    • Query the source to know whether buffers have already been processed
    • If so, dequeue those buffers, refill them with fresh data and re-enqueue them

In practice, since it involves threads, it’s a bit more obtuse than the pseudo-code, but OpenAL makes it relatively painless. The trick is to read enough data and often enough to avoid buffer underruns.

Then, if you want to loop the sound, it’s not as easy as setting the source’s “Looping” parameter to true, because the buffers never contain the full sound file. Instead of no longer feeding the buffers when you hit the end of the Ogg stream, you just start back at the beginning and feed continuously, which has the nice side-effect of being 100% gapless.

Filters and effects

Finally, I wanted to have one fancy effect that XACT provided : low-pass filtering. This is used extensively in FEZ as a gameplay mechanic, so I could hardly live without it in MonoGame ports.

Thankfully, OpenAL Effect Extensions (EFX) provide cross-platform effects including filters, at least in theory. In reality, this depends on whether the driver implementation supports them, and even the Creative reference Windows implementation doesn’t on my system.

I was able to find a software implementation that does though, OpenAL Soft, and it’s cross-platform, so that bodes well.
To override the installed implementation, just supply the software DLL in the application’s directory and voilà. Had no problems with it up to now, performance or otherwise.

Plus, it comes with a console application that outputs which EFX and other extensions are supported in this implementation. This is handy to detect whether the right DLL’s been used, and helped me figured out that the Creative implementation didn’t support any filter. Here’s what it should say :

Sample class

The result of all of this is a OggStream class that is in my fork of NVorbis on GitHub, which you can find here :

Update : Version 2.0 comes with a sample console application which allows you to test and visualize how different streams get buffered and when buffer underruns occur in a nice concise format. I’m really quite happy about it, give it a shot! Here’s how it looks :

Legend of the symbols that this app blurts out :

  • (* means synchronous buffering (Prepare()) has started, and ) means it ended.
  • . means that one buffer has been refilled with fresh samples
  • | means that there are no more samples to consume from the sound file
  • ! means that playback stopped because of a buffer underrun and had to be restarted
  • { and } represent calls to Start() and Stop()
  • [ and ] represent calls to Pause() and Resume()
  • L, F or f and V or v in prefix means respectively that the stream is looping, fading the low-pass filter in/out or fading volume in/out

My code has only been tested on .NET on Windows, but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work in Mono either.
Like all the unlicensed content on this blog, it’s public domain, but attribution is appreciated.

Wrap texture adressing within a sprite sheet or atlas

FEZ shipped with volume textures (aka 3D textures) for all the sprite animations in the game. Gomez, NPCs and other animated pixel art were all done using those. This was a tech call that I made way back in 2008 and kept with it because it makes more sense than you might think :

  • No need to do texture packing and keeping track of where frames are in the sheet; a volume texture is an ordered list of 3D textures, every frame is a slice!
  • The pixel shader just does a tex3D() call with the Z component of the texture coordinates being the step of the animation between 0 and 1.
  • Cool side-effect : hardware linear interpolation between animation frames! This wasn’t very useful for me (except for one thing, water caustic overlays), but it’s a nice bonus.
  • Mip-mapping with 3D textures is problematic because it downsizes in X, Y and Z, meaning that each mip level halves the number of frames. However, I didn’t need mip mapping at all (for sprites), I never undersample pixel art.
  • Same limitation when making a volume texture power-of-two, it also goes power-of-two in the Z axis which means a lot of blank frames, which is wasteful but not a huge problem to deal with.

But while I haven’t done real testing, one can assume that they’re slower than a regular 2D sprite sheet, and they imply that you have one texture by animation, which restricts how much you can pack things together. Creating a volume texture at load-time with XNA Texture2D.SetData() calls means one call per animation frame, which is noticeably slow. Also, volume textures are not currently supported by MonoGame, and I assume some integrated graphics hardware would have trouble dealing with them.

So the more traditional alternative is using a sprite sheet, which is easy to make using tools like the Sprite Sheet Packer.

But then what if you need to use wrap texture addressing on it, to have horizontally and/or vertically repeating textures?

If you only repeat on one axis, have relatively small textures and a small number of frames, you can force the texture packer to layout the sprites on a single row or column, which allows wrapping on the other axis.

This worked for some animations, but some were just too big or had too many frames to fit it in under 4096 pixels. In that case, there’s one final option : pixel shaders to the rescue!

When addressing the texture in your shader, you’re likely to use a 3×3 texture matrix, or a 4D vector if you’re short on input parameters. Either way, you have four components : UV offset and UV scale. You can use those to manually wrap the texture coordinates on a per-pixel basis. In the sample below, I extract the data from a texture matrix.

Vertex Shader

Out.TextureCoordinates = mul(float3(In.TextureCoordinates, 1), Matrices_Texture).xy;
Out.UVMinimum = Matrices_Texture[2].xy;
Out.UVScale = float2(Matrices_Texture[0][0], Matrices_Texture[1][1]);

Pixel Shader

float2 tc = In.TextureCoordinates;
tc = frac((tc - In.UVMinimum) / In.UVScale) * In.UVScale + In.UVMinimum;
float4 sample = tex2D(AnimatedSampler, tc);

The frac() HLSL intrinsic retains the decimal part of its input, which gives the normalized portion of the texture that the coordinates are supposed to show. Then I remap that to the sprite’s area in the atlas, and sample using those.

I ended up only needing wrapping on one axis for that big texture/animation, but this code does both just in case. This is WAY simpler than customizing the vertex texture coordinates to allow wrapping.
One caveat though, this won’t play well with linear filtering. Since FEZ is pixel art, I could get away with point sampling and had no artifacts there.

P.S. A simple fix to enable usage of linear filtering : pad the sprites with 1 pixel column and rows of the opposite side of the texture! (and don’t include those in the sampled area; it only gets sampled by the interpolator)

Pico Battle

Updated 04/07/2012 : Version 1.1 — see below for patch notes & downloads.

At long last!

Pico Battle is a game I initially made with Aliceffekt for the Prince Of Arcade event of early November 2011, which more than half a year ago. But between FEZ, Volkenessen, Diluvium and Waiting for Horus, we never took the time to actually finish it properly, until now!

In its PoA demo form, it used the same crude networking code as The Cloud Is A Lie, which requires two computers plugged in the same LAN or ideally directly by a cross-wired ethernet cable. Releasing that particular version publicly made little sense, so we decided to make a much more extensive multiplayer version.

Above, Pico Battle 2011 (albeit a terribly compressed and cropped screenshot).
And below, the version we’re releasing! :)

This game’s name might remind you of another Prince of Arcade game, this one in 2010 — Pico³. It’s the same basic idea of playing with colors, mixing and matching them, but this time in a competitive versus environment.

How To Play

Upon launching the game, you will find yourself in the Lobby, a temporary haven. You should look for an hexagon floating about the edges of your screen (right click drag to rotate around the planet) and click on it to practice against the AI. You might see circles too, they are other players and could challenge you as soon as you raise your shield.

To protect yourself against incoming attacks, find the patch of dirt marked by a black & white circle, and connect a node to it. The shield will light up, eating away at the incoming bullets with a similar hue. In the lobby, you are invisible to potential attackers as long as your shield is unpowered.

To win against your opponent, locate a patch of mushrooms and connect nodes to it — this is your cannon. It needs a minimum amount of power to be able to fire, and based on the incoming nodes, will fire bullets of various sizes and colours; easier or harder to defend against. The idea being to match the colour of incoming bullets with your shield, and to differ as much as possible from the opponent’s shield colour (which is indicated by the contour of his circular icon) with your cannon’s bullets.

Pico Battle is an entirely wordless game, and might seem offputting or hard to grasp at first. In the lobby, a robotic voice will explain the basics of the game, and take your time there to experiment with the controls and the scarce UI elements. As you get familiar with the game and its interface, you will discover strategies and enjoy it even more.

Updates

04/07/2012 — Version 1.1

  • Fixed bug where the AI wouldn’t defend itself if it is challenged too quickly
  • AI now raises a random shield before you attack with any colour
  • Fixed graphical issue on arc-link shadows
  • Escape key now quits the game if pressed in the lobby

Downloads

Windows Version – picobattle_pc.zip
Mac OS X Version – picobattle_mac.zip

The soundtrack is available on Aliceffekt’s blog entry for the game.

Diluvium – TOJam 7

Updated 15/06/2012!
See bottom of the post for updated download links.

Diluvium is a game I made with Aliceffekt, Henk Boom and Dom2D as Les Collégiennes over the course of TOJam The Sevening, a 48h game jam (though we had a ~8h headstart on that) which took place between May 11th and 13th 2012.

Gameplay

Diluvium is a versus typing tactics game.
There are two summoners on the battlefield, and you are one of them. Type animal names to summon them, and they will attack the enemy’s spawns and ultimately the enemy summoner himself. The first to kill the other one wins, as these things usually are.

You can type up to three animal names in a row, which spawns a totem of these three animals. Each animal has its own stats : speed, attack power, health and intelligence. The totem is as intelligent as its most intelligent member, and health is summed up, but movement speed is averaged.

If someone spawns a dog on the playfield, nobody can spawn another dog until it dies. No duplicate animal! Thankfully you have 284 animal names to choose from, 100 of which are illustrated differently.

The game has a half-assed single-player mode that you can access by typing “LOCAL” in the connection screen. Otherwise, the game should work fine in LAN and over the Internet, as long as you open up the server’s port 10000 (I’m not sure whether Unity networking uses TCP or UDP, so go for both). The connection screen lets you know your LAN and WAN IPs as you host the game.

Things you can also enter at the connection prompt : “MUTE” to kill the music, “IDDQD” for degreelessness mode, and one other secret code which will be revealed elsewhere on the interwebs!

For more information about the commands you can enter on the splash screen, see Aliceffekt’s wiki page on Diluvium.

Development

This was the second network multiplayer game I’ve worked on that uses actual Unity networking instead of a hacked up UDP sender/receiver pair. It’s SO MUCH EASIER TO SET UP! And it works consistently, no threading bugs and random Unity crashes. Knowing this makes me much more comfortable in attempting more network-multiplayer games in jams. The Cloud Is A Lie was a nightmare to keep synchronized, it would’ve been so much easier with the built-in stuff.

We had sort of an Montréal Indie Superstar version of Les Collégiennes this time at TOJam, with FRACT‘s Henk with me on code and Dom2D as an animal portraits factory for the whole weekend. Aliceffekt and Dom’s visual styles merged really well, and having all this extra super talented manpower allowed us to create a much more ambitious game. Henk happened to have working pathfinding classes just lying around, and his deeper knowledge of Unity intricacies meant less time spent fighting bugs and oddities. It was such a great jam! ^_^

Updates

Version 1.1 – 15/06/2012

  • Server Naming : You can now name your games and tell your friend to connect to it by name instead of IP! (IP still works, though)
  • Anonymatching : Create a server and wait for a user, or join an anonymous server randomly!
  • NAT Punchthrough : Server no longer needs to forward port 10000
  • Adaptative AI : In local mode, AI opponent spawns more/less units per second depending on wins/losses
  • Splash Redesign : Options better presented, no more accidental enter key press
  • Balancing, a handful of new animal names supported
  • Escape key quits to splash at any time during gameplay

Downloads

Diluvium v1.1 – Windows version
Diluvium v1.1 – Mac version

Enjoy!

Cubes All The Way Down @ IGS (GDC)

This again?!

I re-did my slides and my talk at the Independent Games Summit of the GDC 2012. It grew from a measly 42 slides to a healthy 62, so there is more content, many more videos, and incorporates some of the feedback I had about the MIGS version.
Update : it’s on the GDC Vault, (no membership required!) if you want to see me give the presentation.

Without further ado, here are the slides in different formats :

It’s Cubes All The Way Down (PDF format)(PDF with Notes)(PPTX format)

And you can download the associated Videos and songs (179Mb!)